Platos soul and the homunculus problem

Pre-Cartesian Views on the Pineal Gland The pineal gland or pineal body is a small gland in the middle of the head. Sagittal section of brain, view from the left, the surface of the medial half of the right side is seen.

Platos soul and the homunculus problem

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However, the theories differ in a major way. However, the Homunculus theory entails a philosophical dilemma, which will soon be addressed, rupturing the credibility of the theory. To show that Plato is innocent of these charges, this essay will analyze both theories and the dilemma threatening them in order to ascertain a verdict.

There are three in total including reason, spirit, and appetite, each is unique having its own goal. Reason speaks for justice of the soul, spirit aids and helps monitor reason to suppress appetite, while appetite lusts and is full of desires — ones which need to be controlled.

These are contradictory opposites. On paged, Plato gives the example of the spinning top, which in some non-contradictory sense both moves and does not move at the same time.

To Plato, however, a contradiction would apply only applies if you look at the movement as a whole, once you assign movement to specific parts of the top it begins to make sense. For example, a point at the very center of the top will not move, however a point along its circumference will.

Plato offers another example of when genuine contradiction occurs in the mind, on pagec, when he describes a thirsty person who does not want to drink. We will choose as our example a version of the Homunculus Theory discussed in D.

We can reject homunculus theories as ways to define cognitive action, such as sight, because of the danger of circular definitions but we might be able to accept in principle homunculus theories as explanations for how certain cognitive processes occur.

Take as an example how the process of sight might occur: According to a version of this theory, a visual homunculus in the brain sees an image of the object. However, the homunculus theory has a major weakness — it becomes subject to a philosophical dilemma First part: Without a need for explanation the theory of a homunculus is void.

The second part of the dilemma arises if there is need for an explanation: Some vulnerability to the Homunculus problem can seemingly be found in Book 4 of The Republic. On pageb-c, Plato argues: In other instances as well, Plato finds himself threatened by the dilemma, for instance, in his juxtaposition of the soul and the state, he divides the state into three parts corresponding with those in the soul.

In both cases a harmony among the three parts is necessary for universal justice. A city functions due to a joint effort of each social class, the auxiliaries, the nobles, and the working class, each with their own role and contribution. To avoid these charges, following Dennett, a Homunculus-Theory advocate could argue that the theory is valid as long as the smaller cognitive sub-division functions to a lesser degree than the whole or the one just above it.

For example, the overall vision of an individual is composed of a three-dimensional experience, involving width, depth, and height.Plato's Concept of the Body and Soul Distinction A:Plato believed that humans could be broken down into 3 parts: the body, the mind and the soul.

Plato’s Theory of Soul and The Homunculus Problem Essay Sample

Plato’s Theory of Soul and The Homunculus Problem Rebecca Vinci Plato’s theory of the soul and the Homunculus theory of human cognition are two distinct theories that both allude to the.

Plato's tripartite theory of soul is a theory of psyche proposed by the ancient Greek philosopher Plato in his treatise the Republic, and also with the chariot allegory in arteensevilla.com Republic, Plato asserted that the ψυχή (psyche) is composed of three parts; the λογιστικόν (logistykon, logical), the θυμοειδές (thymoeides, spirited) and the ἐπιθυμητικόν.

Platos soul and the homunculus problem

Plato believed that the soul is immortal. That the soul existed before it came to the physical body, and it is still there when the body dies. This is a dualistic interpretation of the mind/body problem.

Plato linked the soul to a charioteer in charge of two horses, the mind and the body, which are pulling in completely opposite directions. Platos Tripartite Soul Essay Plato’s Theory of Soul and The Homunculus Problem Rebecca Vinci Plato’s theory of the soul and the Homunculus theory of human cognition are two distinct theories that both allude to the concept of a mind having smaller parts within it that are assigned to certain tasks and each responsible for the function.

So I offer this little chart only as one more small aid in trying to make sense of what Plato meant by the three distinct elements of the soul that he delineated. One other common misconception: Some think that Plato believes these three elements of the psyche should be in balance with each other, i.e., should each have its equal "say" in a person's life.

Plato's tripartite theory of soul is a theory of psyche proposed by the ancient Greek philosopher Plato in his treatise the Republic, and also with the chariot allegory in Phaedrus.

In Republic, Plato asserted that the ψυχή (psyche) is composed of three parts; the λογιστικόν (logistykon, logical), the θυμοειδές (thymoeides, spirited) and the ἐπιθυμητικόν (epithymetikon, appetitive).

The Homunculus problem